Clementine curd

Clementine curd doughnut at HH Bakery. Source: DWD.
Clementine curd doughnut at HH Bakery. Source: DWD.

As December approaches, we enter the height of clementine season. The smell of this amber fruit immediately sends me back to countless Christmas mornings, rummaging amongst chocolate coins and christmas parcels to the bottom of my stocking where I could find a clementine or two.

Here I use clementines to make a delicious curd, which is both sharp and sweet in equal measure. It is hugely versatile and can be used in place of any recipe that calls for lemon curd, for a festive alternative. I pipe the curd into doughnuts, until they are fit to burst (around 40g of curd per large doughnut).

Ingredients (makes 900g):

7 large clementines

2 lemons

350g caster sugar

4 eggs, beaten

3 egg yolks, beaten

100g unsalted butter, diced

Method: Set up an bain marie by heating a large pan of water to a gentle boil. Add a heat-proof bowl over the pan but ensure the water is not in contact with the bottom of the bowl.

Zest and juice all of the fruit and add it to bowl, along with the yolks, eggs and sugar and mix to combine.

Add the butter and stir constantly, so as not to scramble the eggs. Cook until the curd is thick, and coats the back of a spoon at least.

Either add to sterilised jars as a beautiful Christmas gift or keep, refrigerated, until needed. The curd will keep for up to two weeks.

This recipe is an adaptation of George Socratous’ for Jamie Magazine.

A baker’s hot toddy

hot toddy 2

Until recently I thought this honey, whiskey and lemon combination was a drink exclusively for victims of winter’s illnesses, or those with trouble sleeping. That was until a Canadian baker I had the pleasure of working with suggested it as a festive alternative to a beer, for marking the end of the week in the bakery.

Admittedly I had to do some reading, as I wasn’t entirely sure of a reliable hot toddy formula. Eventually I found one, and as Friday arrived, so too did the hot toddies.

hot toddy 1

We added a slice of apple to ours, providing not only the delicious smell of spiced cider, but a little treat at the bottom of the cup when all the whiskey has been washed away.

Here’s a slight variation on the traditional Scottish hot toddy:

1 measure of whiskey
1 heaped tsp of honey
2 cloves
1 cinnamon stick
1 slice of lemon
1-2 tsp of lemon juice
1 mug of hot water

Add all the ingredients, besides the hot water into a mug. Pour over just-boiled water (90/95c) and give a good stir. The reason for using water that isn’t boiling here is that if it is too hot, the whiskey’s alcoholic properties can deteriorate, which isn’t very jolly at all.

Best enjoyed with Christmas Wrapping by The Waitresses. Merry Christmas everyone!